Social Studies

Our goal is to prepare our students for intellectually active participation in the global society and to remain at the forefront of independent schools nationally with our coursework in modern world history, United States history, U.S. government, and economics. History is the central focus of our social studies program because we believe that creating an understanding of the past provides students with the perspective to make intelligent decisions in the present and the future. Seniors may elect to take courses on economics, 20th century U.S. history, the Middle East, and East Asia, among other topics. We offer college-level Advanced Placement courses in U.S. history, European history, U.S. government, and economics.
There are no constituents to display
Dr. Fleming has been at Woodward Academy since 1975. He teaches Advanced Placement U.S. history and senior electives. Dr. Fleming earned his Ph.D. from Emory University.

Social Studies Courses

U.S. Government/Economics

This required ninth grade course emphasizes independent thinking. It introduces students to the structure and function of American government and introduces basic micro- and macroeconomic concepts.

Modern World History

This course introduces students to the 400-year period beginning around 1500 A.D. It is designed as an initial study of major modern historical figures and the modern social, political, and economic forces at work in Europe and Asia.

U.S. History 3

This course covers the growth of the United States from colonial times to the modern world. Topics include the American Revolution, the political and economic maturing of the country, the American Civil War, the growth of national government power, social movements, and U.S. involvement in 20th century international affairs such as World War I and World War II.

Honors U.S. History

This course for honors students in 10th and 11th grades stresses reading and interpretation of primary U.S. political, economic, and social documents as well as analysis of major movements in U.S. history and an emphasis on writing and research.

History of East Asia

This senior elective explores the historical foundations and current state of contemporary issues in East Asian nations, focusing on major events and trends in Chinese and Japanese history, politics, society, and economics with relevance to the current era.

History of the Middle East

This senior elective explores the historical foundations and current state of contemporary issues in Middle East nations, examining and discussing major events and trends in Middle Eastern history, politics, society, and economics relevant to the current era.

U.S. & World Affairs: The 1950s and 1960s

This senior elective looks at two of our most interesting decades, the 1950s and 1960s, with a major focus on the Cold War as well as an introduction to the Korean War, McCarthyism, the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, and the 1960s counterculture.

U.S. Political Economy & its Critical Choices 1

This senior elective analyzes major economic problems currently facing the U.S. and the world, with reading, analysis, and discussion of political and economic issues such as environmental policy, immigration, health care, and other topics.

U.S. Political Economy & its Critical Choices 2

This senior elective analyzes major economic problems currently facing the U.S. and the world, with reading, analysis, and discussion about economic growth, the rise of China and India as economic contenders, U.S. fiscal and monetary policy, financial markets, foreign exchange, international trade, and other topics.

Landmark Supreme Court Cases: Civil Liberties

This course is an in-depth study of the parts of the U.S. Constitution that affect civil liberties, the 1st, 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th, and 14th Amendments, approached through study of Supreme Court cases.

Topics in Multicultural, Ethnic & Diversity Studies

This introductory survey course examines America's diverse cultural heritage through the voices and visions of different racial, religious, and ethnic groups including Native-, African-, Jewish-, Muslim-, Irish-, Italian-, Asian-, and Latino-Americans. The course also examines the roles of women and people who are differently abled as well as those with different sexual orientations. Themes include history, art, literature, sociology, psychology, music, pop culture, and the media.

Military History from the Ancient World to Modern America

This survey course covers military history over the past 5,000 years, addressing the origins of war, ancient warfare, warfare in the Middle Ages, modern war, and the evolution of tactics, strategy, and weapons. Conflicts studied include the Greco-Persian wars, the Norman invasion of England, the American Civil War, and World Wars I and II.

A.P. U.S. History

In this year-long Advanced Placement course, students study the political, economic, and social factors that contributed to the development of the United States from its colonial beginnings to the post-Watergate era. In May, students take the AP exam in U.S. history to qualify for college credit.

A.P. European History

This year-long Advanced Placement course covers major events and trends in Europe from 1450 to the present, with emphasis on social, intellectual, economic, religious, and political developments in modern Western Europe. In May, students take the AP exam for college credit.

A.P. U.S. Government & Politics

This year-long Advanced Placement course focuses on the ideas of political philosophers, public voting behavior and national elections, political activities of Congress and the President, and controversial Supreme Court decisions. In the spring, students analyze important political concerns facing the U.S., and students take the AP exam for college credit in May.

A.P. Microeconomics

In this year-long Advanced Placement course, students learn about decisions encountered by private-sector businesses, including publicly owned companies, analyzing case studies and presenting their findings. Students take the AP Microeconomics exam in May.
Powered by Finalsite